One-third of the soldiers who fought for the Union Army were immigrants, and nearly one in 10 was African American.
The Union Army was a multicultural force—even a multinational one. We often hear about Irish soldiers (7.5 percent of the army), but the
Union’s ranks included even more Germans (10 percent), who marched off in regiments such as the Steuben Volunteers. Other immigrant
soldiers were French, Italian, Polish, English and Scottish. In fact, one in four regiments contained a majority of foreigners. Blacks were
permitted to join the Union Army in 1863, and some scholars believe this infusion of soldiers may have turned the tide of the war.
Cemetery Ridge
1st PA Cavalry Monument
All rights reserved.
GETTYSBURG
A New Birth of Freedom
The Battle of Gettysburg was a turning point in the Civil War, the Union victory that ended General Robert E. Lee's second and most ambitious
invasion of the North. Often referred to as the "High Water Mark of the Rebellion", Gettysburg was the Civil War's bloodiest battle and was also
the inspiration for President Abraham Lincoln's immortal "Gettysburg Address".
Cemetery Ridge
Pennsylvania Memorial
Big Round Top
9th Massachusetts
Volunteer Infantry
Big Round Top
10th PA Reserves
Dedicated in 1890
Cemetery Ridge
1st Minnesota Monument
Dedicated in 1893
1st Minnesota Wayside Marker
They Sacrificed Themselves to Buy Time to Plug the Union Line
42nd New York Monument
CEMETERY RIDGE
It formed a primary defensive position for the Union Army during the battle,
roughly the center of what is popularly known as the "fish-hook" line. The
Confederate army launched attacks on the Union positions on the second
and third days of the battle, but were driven back both times.
Cemetery Ridge
Artillery Limbers for Cushing's Battery
Cemetery Ridge
Cowan's Battery
Monument
THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG
Was fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil
War. The battle involved the largest number of casualties of the entire war and is often described as the war's turning point. Union Maj. Gen.
George Meade's Army of the Potomac defeated attacks by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, ending Lee's attempt to
invade the North.

After his success at Chancellorsville in Virginia in May 1863, Lee led his army through the Shenandoah Valley to begin his second invasion of
the North—the Gettysburg Campaign. With his army in high spirits, Lee intended to shift the focus of the summer campaign from war-ravaged
northern Virginia and hoped to influence Northern politicians to give up their prosecution of the war by penetrating as far as Harrisburg,
Pennsylvania, or even Philadelphia. Prodded by President Abraham Lincoln, Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker moved his army in pursuit, but was
relieved of command just three days before the battle and replaced by Meade.
Cemetery Ridge - Cushing's Union Battery
Father Corby Gave the Irish Brigade Absolution From
This Rock as they Headed to the Wheatfield
Cemetery Ridge
Cushing's Union Battery at the Angle
Pickett's Charge was Stopped at This Point
General
Alexander Webb
Monument
General John Sedgwick Monument
General George Gordon Meade
Commander of the Army of the Potomac
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