ARIZONA
Heard
Museum
INDIAN
HERITAGE
MUSEUM
The swastika motif was used by some Native American groups. It was also
widely used by many southwestern tribes, most notably the Navajo. Among
various tribes, the swastika carried different meanings. To the Hopi it represented
the wandering Hopi clan; to the Navajo it was one symbol for a whirling log (tsil
no'oli), a sacred image representing a legend that was used in healing rituals.
Apology for the "fuzziness" of some of these photos as the Heard Museum has a strict "No Flash" policy inside its Museum.
WORLD LARGEST COLLECTION
OF KACHINA DOLLS
Kachinas are spirits or personifications of things in the real world. A kachina can represent anything in the natural world or
cosmos, from a revered ancestor to an element, a location, a quality, a natural phenomenon, or a concept. There are more than 400
different kachinas in Hopi culture. There may be kachinas for the sun, stars, thunderstorms, wind, corn, insects, and many other
concepts. Kachinas are understood as having humanlike relationships; they may have uncles, sisters, and grandmothers, and may
marry and have children. Although not worshipped, each is viewed as a powerful being who, if given veneration and respect, can
use their particular power for human good, bringing rainfall, healing, fertility, or protection, for example.