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Pittsburgh
1940's
ALL THINGS PITTSBURGH
RENAISSANCE I
"Renaissance I" began in 1946. Title One of the Housing Act of 1949 provided the means in which to begin. By 1950,
vast swaths of buildings and land near the Point were demolished for Gateway Center.
Pittsburgh's Ever Present Rain
Carloads of Fruits and Vegetables at Terminal.
THE GOLDEN AGE OF JAZZ IN PITTSBURGH
Poet Claude McKay called Pittsburgh's Hill District the “Crossroads of the World”. The Hill was the home of immigrants
from 25 countries and a national center for African-American sports, journalism, theater and commerce. It was also a
crossroads for jazz artists from around the country who performed with Pittsburgh's many acclaimed musicians in the
Hill's jazz venues.  A jazz Renaissance began on the Hill in the early 1920s and continued through the 1960s.  Jazz
evolved and thrived in Hill District's many lively night clubs, dance ballrooms, theaters and the Musicians Club.  Jazz
giants Earl Hines, Roy Eldridge, Erroll Garner, Kenny Clarke, Art Blakey, Stanley Turrentine Billy Eckstine, Mary Lou
Williams, Ray Brown, George Benson and many others learned and honed their talents on the Hill.  WHOD DJ Mary Dee,
who broadcast from a storefront on the Hill, pinpointed the location of the "Cross Roads of the World" at the corner of
Wylie Avenue and Fullerton Street.  The jazz clubs located on along Wylie Avenue, Fullerton Street, Centre Avenue and
Crawford Street were the heart of the neighborhood’s entertainment district.  
Above: Flag Day - Pittsburgh, PA

Right: A child drinking Pepsi Cola before the
service held on Memorial Day at the
Lithuanian Cemetery

Children at a Movie House on a Sunday.
Dirty 'Ol Dahntahn
Billy Eckstine's band in Pittsburgh in 1944.
From left to right: Lucky Thompson, Dizzy Gillespie,
Charlie Parker, and Billy Eckstine.
Passengers in the Waiting Room of the Greyhound Bus Terminal - Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Champion No. 1 Cleaning Plant
Picture On Right: The lower bracket of the 30,000 kilowatt waterwheel generator which Westinghouse
Electric Company is manufacturing for the Watts Bar Dam of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The
total weight of the generator is 955,000 pounds. The eight arms of the lower bracket which extend
outwards are fastened to the foundation on which the generator rests and bear the brunt of its weight.
Random Street Scene - Pittsburgh, PA
Location Unknown