STILL THE STEEL MAKING CAPITAL OF THE WORLD
Description of the photograph reads, “UNIQUE IN THE WORLD --- is the specialty steelmaking complex at Natrona, Pa., 25 miles up the Allegheny River from
Downtown Pittsburgh, where Allegheny Ludlum Steel Corporation melts stainless and other specialty steels in a combination of hot blast cupola and basic oxygen
converter (pictured here). It is the only company in the world melting specialty steels via this method --- thus maintaining Allegheny Ludlum’s position as the
world’s leader in specialty steel producing. Many specialty steels (stainless, tool steel, high temperature metals, vacuum melted superalloys) and titanium were
developed and pioneered by Allegheny Ludlum. The company is a division of Allegheny Ludlum Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh-headquartered billion-dollar-a-year
diversified manufacturing corporation with operations at 80 locations throughout the nation.”
Stephen Foster Memorial Building
The Stephen Foster Memorial Building was constructed to pay homage to Stephen Foster, an
American composer. The structure, dedicated on June 2, 1937, adjoins the Cathedral of
Learning and faces Forbes Avenue in Pittsburgh’s Oakland section. The structure designed
by Charles Z. Klauder of Philadelphia at a cost of $500,000, was built in the Gothic style
with 35000 cubic feet of Indiana limestone, 400 tons of steel, and 2500 cubic yards of
concrete. The left wing of the Memorial (pictured here) houses the Center for American
Music, which is dedicated to expanding and documenting knowledge of American music and
its cultural and social roles in American life. On display here are several musical
instruments, including one of Foster’s pianos; copies of over 200 of his musical
compositions, examples of recordings, songsters, broadside, programs, and various
memorabilia.
All rights reserved.
Pittsburgh
1960's
ALL THINGS PITTSBURGH
ALL PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA
PHOTO RESTORATION DONE BY THE STEELCACTUS FOUNDATION

ADDITIONAL VERBIAGE BY THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA
NORTH PARK POOL - 1964
North Park Pool was once considered the largest in the world; it holds 2.5 million gallons of water (compared to 20-30,000 gallons in a modern city swimming pool).
In the 1930s and 1940s, before swimming pools proliferated in homes throughout the United States, the monstrous North Park Pool seemed a logical response to
the “bathing” needs of everyone living north of Pittsburgh.
Carnegie Institute Building
The entrance to the Carnegie Institute Building, located at 4400
Forbes Avenue in Pittsburgh’s Oakland neighborhood, was designed
by Longfellow, Alden & Harlow in 1895. The structure stretches 600
feet long on its Schenley Plaza facade and almost 800 feet long on
its Forbes Avenue side. This eight-acre building is the grandest
monument of Beaux Arts planning in Pittsburgh and appeared in the
Encyclopedia Britannica of 1911 as the exemplar of the modern
museum. Inside, the building contains six thousand tons of
European marble, some from the very quarry that supplied Pentelic
marble for the Parthenon in Athens. Some 10,000 exhibits of
natural history are on display, with twenty times that number kept
in reserve for scientific study. Today, the museums of art and
natural history, the library and its eighteen branches, the music
hall, and the lecture hall support more activities than any other
American cultural institution, except the Smithsonian.
McKEES ROCKS BRIDGE
The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette was originally published by John Scull and Joseph Hall as the Pittsburgh Gazette on July 29, 1786, becoming the first
newspaper published west of the Allegheny Mountains. In the 1820s the newspaper’s name was changed to the Pittsburgh Gazette and Manufacturing
and Mercantile Advertiser under the leadership of Morgan Neville, however, the name was changed back to the Pittsburgh Gazette when David McClean
took the helm. During the McClean years the newspaper became one of the chief spokesmen for anti-slavery in the Northern United States. The Post-
Gazette finally acquired its current name in the late 1920s, when owner Paul Block bought the Pittsburgh Press and the Gazette-Times and merged the
two papers together, forming the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. It was also under his leadership that the Post-Gazette moved its advertising, business,
circulation, and printing operations from the Gazette Square Building to the Pittsburgh Press facility. The Gazette Square building was constructed in
1915 by George T. Oliver who owned by the Gazette-Times and the Chronicle-Telegraph. The building was originally known as the Chronicle-Telegraph
building. Both papers were published in this building until 1927 when Block created the Post-Gazette. Block later bought the property from then
owner, William Randolph Hearst in April, 1960. The building was demolished in the late 1960s.
THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL
The Three Rivers Arts Festival was held in the plazas and lobbies of the five buildings of Pittsburgh's Gateway Center through courtesy of the Equitable Life
Assurance Society of the United States, and was sponsored by Carnegie Institute of Art. The juried art on display included paintings, drawings, prints, sculpture,
and crafts.  The Festival, a free exposition, was supported through the generosity of foundations, corporations, interested individuals, business associations, the
City of Pittsburgh, and the County of Allegheny. A great deal of the festival's success rested with its volunteer workers. In 1970 their number more than doubled
from 900 to 2,000 since the festival first started in 1960. Since 1961, it had jurors of national prominence and they have also acted as a consultants in forming and
guiding similar arts fairs in several states.
Allegheny Court House & Jail
Saint Paul's Catholic Cathedral
NEVILLE ISLAND