Heidelburg Race Track
October 25, 1963 - The scrap yard of the W.F. Wimmer Company on Pittsburgh’s North Side neighborhood. The close proximity to the
Allegheny River made this site an ideal place for scrap heaps and railroad tracks prior to the construction of Three Rivers Stadium.
During the late 1960s, the Buncher Company scrap yard, owned by real estate developer Jack Buncher, along with the W.F. Wimmer
facilities (pictured here) were razed to make way for Three Rivers Stadium.
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Pittsburgh
1960's
ALL THINGS PITTSBURGH
ALL PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA
PHOTO RESTORATION DONE BY THE STEELCACTUS FOUNDATION

ADDITIONAL VERBIAGE BY THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA
MARKET SQUARE
In 1961 the Diamond Market, two buildings connected by an elevated foot bridge, was demolished to make way for Market Square Park. The Park, split by Forbes
Avenue (formerly Diamond Street), included brick pavements, grass, and trees, and offered office workers and visitors a place to gather and occasionally enjoy public
events.
An aerial view of the Point and the Point Bridge (being
dismantled) spanning the Monongahela River. On the left is the
Manchester Bridge spanning the Allegheny River, which was
demolished in 1970. At the center of Point State Park is the
outline for the original Fort Pitt and located directly above it is
a small cluster of trees obscuring the Fort Pitt Blockhouse. The
Fort Pitt Bridge (far right) opened on June 19, 1959. The Fort
Duquesne Bridge (upper left), or known locally as “The Bridge to
Nowhere,” went nowhere because of difficulties in locating a
suitable site to place its northern ramps. The main span of this
bridge was finished in 1963, and it wasn’t until 1969 when it was
finally opened to traffic.
During the glory days of the movie industry, the Loew’s Penn Theatre on
Sixth Street in downtown Pittsburgh was one of the most elaborate
movie palaces in the United States, site of premieres and long-runs. It
was built in 1927 by motion picture magnate Marcus Loew and the last
production there was Hello Dolly starring Carol Channing in 1967. In
February 1970, a sell-out performance of a “Pop Spectacular” (theatre
marquee) was performed. ‘Doc’ Severinson was a featured soloist. Local
singer Jeanne Baxter sang “It’s All Right With Me” as Henry Mazer
directed; Brokett and Barbara spoofed the theater and the mayor.
Eventually the entire block shown here on Sixth Street was purchased to
make way for the remodeling of the corner building to later become Heinz
Hall. The building in the background housed Woolworth’s on the first
floor and was later razed to make way for a fountain near Heinz Hall.
SIGNS OF THINGS TO COME...
MARKET SQUARE
Heidelburg Race Track (pictured here), located in Heidelburg, Pennsylvania, held the seventh NASCAR Winston Cup event in its initial
year on October 2, 1949. Residents who lived near the track often complained about the loud noise and dust levels that the track
created during racing events. Interstate Highway 79 now passes directly through this site and a strip mall is located nearby.
Heidelberg is a borough located in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, with a total population of 1225 in the year 2000.
National Aviary
Rising above the First Lutheran Church on Grant Street in downtown
Pittsburgh, the Bell Telephone Building is an example of a popular style of
architecture called “the International School.” Derided by some critics as a
totally forgettable building, the structure does boast the distinction of
being nuclear-bomb-resistant. Architect H.J. Larsen designed the $21
million, 16-story structure with strength in mind because of the heavy
equipment that would be housed there. The floor load capacity is 300
pounds per square foot, substantially higher than the 50 to 60 pounds per
square foot of a typical office building. Construction of the building was
completed in 1969.
1968 - In the foreground Seventh Avenue borders the site for the new U.S. Steel Building (presently known as the U.S. Steel Tower) in downtown
Pittsburgh. On the opposite side of the site is the First Lutheran Church on Grant Street to the right of the H.K. Porter Building.
June, 1969