All rights reserved.
PALMER'S PITTSBURGH
1905
ALL THINGS PITTSBURGH
ALL PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF THE PITT DIGITAL LIBRARY
PHOTO RESTORATION DONE BY THE STEELCACTUS FOUNDATION
Historic Old Homestead
Former home of Colonel Charles Morgan, where
Aaron Burr stopped en route to Blennerhassett Island.
South side of Fifth Avenue between Wood and Smithfield in 1840.  From drawing by Charles Glenn.  The small, one-story building on the left
end of picture was occupied by Uriah Updegraf as a shovel factory.  Second building from left was the Saloon of John Carney, during cholera
ravages in 1854 it became a coffin factory.  Adjoining was Algeo's Row.  Next to the right was Wm. McKee's Blacksmith Shop.  To the right of the
latter were two dwellings, in one of which lived Charles Reams.  To the right of the dwellings stood the famous old Falstaff House.  The
Pittsburgh Theatre, later known as Old Drury, with its broad steps and plastered front, stood next door.  Edwin Forrest, John Wilkes Booth and
the rest travelled over the Alleghenies in the stage, continuing by steam packets down the Ohio.  The right-hand corner building was Davis'
three-story warehouse.
OLD RAFTSMAN'S TAVERN
Built About 1800
MONUMENT HILL - ALLEGHENY CITY
Showing the First Presbyterian Church in that city and old Stockton House on Stockton Avenue
OLD UNION DEPOT
Before its destruction by the Railroad Rioters in 1877
ST. PAUL'S CATHEDRAL
FIFTH AVENUE, CORNER GRANT STREET
New Cathedral was Erected at Fifth Avenue and Craig Street
PITTSBURGH - 1868
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH WEST OF THE ALLEGHENIES
On the Road to Charleroi
SITE OF THE OLD PENNSYLVANIA CANAL
Where the Union Depot Used to Stand - Eleventh Street and Liberty Avenue
SCENE ON STEAMBOATS
Opening of Davis Island Dam
RAILROAD HOTEL & FOWLER'S EXCHANGE
1861 - Old Bridge at Eleventh Street & Penn Avenue
OLD MARKET HOUSE
Situated at the site of the defunct Fifth Avenue High School
FIRST COURT HOUSE - IN MARKET SQUARE
Torn Down in 1852
Southeast Corner of Smithfield and Diamond
Streets Before Its Demolition in 1890.
OLD FORT PITT
When converted into a dwelling previous to its becoming
the property of the Daughters of the American Revolution
OLD SWISSHELM MANSION
Swissvale
OLD UNION DEPOT
After its destruction by the Railroad Rioters in 1877
THE RAILROAD STRIKE OF 1877
The Great Railroad Strike of 1877, sometimes referred to as the Great Upheaval, began on July 14 in Martinsburg, West Virginia, United States
and ended some 45 days later, after it was put down by local and state militias, and federal troops. Labor unions were not involved; these were
spontaneous outbreaks in numerous cities of violence against railroads.

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania became the site of the worst violence. Thomas Alexander Scott of the Pennsylvania Railroad, often considered one of
the first robber barons, suggested that the strikers should be given "a rifle diet for a few days and see how they like that kind of bread." However,
local law enforcement officers refused to fire on the strikers. Several militia units did turn out, including the 3rd Pennsylvania Infantry
Regiment under the command of Colonel George R. Snowden.

Scott's suggestion came to pass on July 21, when militiamen bayoneted and fired on rock-throwing strikers, killing twenty people and
wounding twenty-nine. Rather than quell the uprising however, this action merely infuriated the strikers who then forced the militiamen to
take refuge in a railroad roundhouse, and then set fires that razed 39 buildings and destroyed 104 locomotives and 1,245 freight and
passenger cars. On July 22, the militiamen mounted an assault on the strikers, shooting their way out of the roundhouse and killing 20 more
people on their way out of the city. After over a month of constant rioting and bloodshed, President Rutherford B. Hayes sent in federal troops to
end the strikes.
GRANT'S HILL
Tablet on present Allegheny County Court House commemorating the
defeat of the British by the French & Indians from Fort Du Quesne.
PUDDLING MILL OF SPANG, CHALFANT & CO., ETNA
Where Natural Gas was first used in 1875.
OLD RED LION HOTEL
Sixth Street.  Was terminus for stage to Washington D.C.  Licensed Inn for
123 years; torn down in 1904.  Many notables were entertained here.
CONFLAGRATION OF APRIL 10th, 1845
From photo by W.C. Wall and loaned by Mr. Wm. Lemon, the well known Pittsburgh Attorney.
In five hours the fire destroyed twenty squares, 1,200 buildings; loss $9,000,000.00.  Fire covered 50 acres.